Legend | David Goldblatt

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David Goldblatt (b. 1930) is an iconic documentary photographer from Johannesburg. His work spans decades, truly capturing the South African landscape especially in black and white film.

With a stream of highlights in his long career, including various exhibitions around the world, several awards and book publications, as well as founding the Market Photography Workshop, he still continues to work in the photographic field.

Website: https://www.davidgoldblatt.com/
Overview: http://www.goodman-gallery.com/artists/davidgoldblatt

Below is a selection of published artist monographs:

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On The Mines (w/ Nadine Gordimer). First published in 1973 (Struik, Cape Town)

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Some Afrikaners Revisited. Published in 2007 (Umuzi, Cape Town)
Some Afrikaners Photographed first published in 1975 (Murray Crawford Johannesburg, South Africa)

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In Boksburg. First published in 1982 (Gallery Press, Cape Town)

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Lifetimes: Under Apartheid (w/ Nadine Gordimer). First published in 1986 (Knopf, New York, USA)

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South Africa: the Structure of Things Then. First published in 1998 (Oxford University Press, Cape Town, and Monacelli Press, New York, USA)

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David Goldblatt 55. First published in 2001 (Phaidon Press, London, England)

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Hasselblad Awards 2006 by M. Godby (M. Hatje Catz Verlag, Ostfildern, Germany)

Watch select interviews and presentations:


Despite attempts to reach Mr Goldblatt via his gallery representative, we believe his work alone can do a lot of talking. It’s great to know he declined because he is too busy with upcoming projects.

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Daniel Futerman

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Daniel Futerman (b. 1986, Durban)
Currently living in Johnnesburg

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I’m not sure I have a preference towards specific subject matter, but I really enjoy wandering through new and familiar spaces and places with a camera at hand. Sometimes the camera stays put, other times I’ll stream through rolls of film. In either case, there’s a consideration and compulsion towards framing and composing images.

Describe your photographic style.

Developing. Over time, I have tried to be more interactional and engaged, deserving of the people and places that I choose to photograph, but sometimes there’s comfort in retreating to a wholly observational approach – the ‘fly-on-the-wall’ mode.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

I think this influence is most evident when I don’t have a camera with me, but find myself noticing all these moments and scenes that I wish I could have photographed.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

There are two distinct approaches with the film cameras that I use – with the medium format camera, it’s a very thought out, constructed process. I’ve grown to prefer this approach – fewer shots, but more consistent results. I also love using the SLR with a more spontaneous, automatic approach. Sometimes the results don’t turn out as expected, but it’s part of the experience, and I’m only trying to impress myself, so it’s of no real concern.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

Nope, I work in public health and informatics. It’s afforded me the opportunity to travel and spend time in some amazing places, which I’m very grateful for.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically, camera arsenal and film stock.

I’ve tried out various film cameras over the years, but I pretty much stick with two now:
– Mamiya RZ67 with a 90mm lens
– Contax RTS with a 35mm ML lens

With film stock, I try to stick with Kodak – Porta 400 for colour, TriX for B&W.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

I’m not involved in photography professionally, so there’s no real pressure to stay motivated, but it happens naturally – it’s an outlet that I’m passionate about, and there’s always a desire to pick up the camera again and improve on the last roll of film that I shot.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I love the work of the more traditional photojournalists from the past few generations. There’s this big Magnum photo book that I always go back to for inspiration, it’s filled with so many greats – Alex Webb, Jim Goldberg, David Alan Harvey, Martin Parr, Thomas Hoepker. Locally, there’s loads of incredible talent and inspiration, particularly with film photography – Kent Andreasen and Ané Strydom to name a few who’s work I admire.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Bicycles. I built up an old rat bike a couple years back to explore the city with, and really took to it. Nowadays, I’m on the track, road or touring bike 3 or 4 times a week.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

There are so many ways to approach photography – do what’s right for you, and if you can enjoy and respect it, keep at it.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)?
And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

Nothing in particular, but I’d like to do more bicycle touring with a camera packed in for the ride.

Website: https://www.thingsastheywere.tumblr.com/
Instagram: @danfuterman

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All photos by Daniel Futerman

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Duran Levinson

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Duran Levinson (b. 1988)
Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

Portraiture, fashion and street photography are my passions within film photography.

Describe your photographic style.

I shoot on film, mainly 35mm and use point and shoot cameras. I like to make images that are fairly simple but have a unique aspect that bring the image together and show the viewer a story or moment in time that has some sort of impact.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

I started taking photography seriously about three years ago when I started travelling through Asia. I documented all my travels on the one film camera I had at the time and the project ended up being successful and was published. After that I decided I would continue with the film photography and it has given me so many opportunities, in terms of visiting countries, and making amazing friends around the world.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

I try not take myself or my work too seriously. I like to plan my shoots but I rely a lot on spontaneous moments and locations to influence the final product. All my Asia work from the fashion to street projects relied a lot on “in the moment” situations and nothing was too heavily planned. I feel like unless I am doing a specific shoot with an end goal in mind I like to leave room for as much creativity as possible within a moment.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

I am a full-time freelancer, but my main income is as an on-set camera and visual effects assistant on international feature films and TV series. In the past two years photography has become a large part of my creative work and it is slowly becoming my full-time job. I am actually focusing on becoming a Director and D.O.P. and having skills as a photographer helps a lot with regards to these fields.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

I used to collect a lot of film cameras but after a while I sold pretty much all of them. The cameras I use at the moment are a Contax T2, Contax G2, Leica Minilux and a Pentax Me Super. I shoot on any film I can get my hands on for a good price, but usually Agfa Vista and Kodak Portra.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and enthusiastic about your work?

I constantly try take photos and portraits even if I cant get my shit together and pre-plan the locations and situations. The whole process of shooting on film and working with analog techniques keeps it interesting and creatively challenging at times.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I’m mainly influenced by filmmakers and Directors of Photography. Roger Ballen, a local photographer who I was lucky enough to meet with recently.

Gasper Noe, an Argentinian director who has made some incredibly disturbing and beautiful movies, such as ‘Enter the Void’ & ‘Love’.

Alejandro Jodorowsky who directed movies such as: ‘The Holy Mountain’ & ‘El Topo’.

Jürgen Schadeberg, whom in my opinion is one of the best photographers of all time. His work is a huge inspiration and I would recommend his photos to anyone who has never heard of him.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Anything that involves cameras, skateboards, Asian food and travelling.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Shooting on film will improve your photography, there’s no question about it.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)? And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I have an exhibition in America this month. A couple in Asia this year and a few photo-zines coming out on independent labels. I have my first solo book coming out in a few months and it will be published by Coy Culture in London.

I’ll be working mainly in China for the next couple of months, focusing on directing commercials and my film photography.

Do you have a specific series or body of work that sums up your portfolio best?

I’d say my work is divided into two distinct styles; Portraiture and Street – which you can check out over on my website.

Website: http://www.duranlevinson.com/
Instagram: @duranite

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All photos by Duran Levinson

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Montage | 002

Instagram fragments.
(February, 2017 pt. 1)

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Amy Harrison | @itsamyhere_

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Gary Van Wyk | @garyvanwykphotography

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Rudi Geyser | @rudi.geyser

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Michael Southey | @mike.southey

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Stan Engelbrecht | @stanengelbrecht

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Gideon de Kock | @gideondk1

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Jabu Nadia Newman | @intellectualangel

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Ross Maxwell | @rossmaxwelllives

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Jen Jengo | @analog_diaries

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Nicola Rehbein | @nicolarehbein

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Thomas Revington | @tommyrocket89

>> Follow our Instagram feed @dead.town

Individual photographs (C) to relevant owners/photographers.

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Alex Bernatzky

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Alex Bernatzky (b. 1990, Johannesburg)
Currently in Berlin

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I’m not going to pretend to have any high ideals for my photography. I mostly just photograph my friends or the places we go together… Okay, I lied, here comes the “pretension”: While my friends are my primary subject matter, what I think I am constantly in search of are moments of pure unfiltered expression. We’re so used to putting up this façade that I think there is a spark of magic that happens when we finally let it drop. I try to capture those moments as a reminder that behind the posturing there is something genuine in everyone.

I also have a bit of an obsession with the remnants of discarded, forgotten and broken things — that started by noticing a pathway in my garden only lead to a brick wall. It has redoubled since moving Berlin and seeing so many discarded CRT TV’s and what’s left of peoples bicycles after everything that has not been chained down has been stolen. Every time I see one I am compelled to stop and photograph it.

Describe your photographic style.

My style is mostly spontaneous and candid, but as I become more interested in abstract concepts, and trying to capture them through photography, I am forced to become more thoughtful and deliberate.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

Photography has actually only just come into prominence in the last three years of my life, but it’s amazing how much it has affected me. As a person, I am quite chaotic and often I just bounce from one moment to the next without really taking stock. However, because my camera is completely 100% manual, from advancing the film to cocking the shutter, I have to slow right down and shift into a more methodical mindset. As a result I become infinitely aware of my surroundings and I start to notice the smaller moments happening around me. Some people do Yoga and meditate; I take photos.

I am also generally extremely shy and introverted, and social situations are often quite overwhelming for me. The camera – and photography – serves as a tool to engage with situations while still maintaining the safety and distance that the camera naturally puts between you and the world around you.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

Generally my approach is to completely embed myself in a situation and then be patient and just wait for the moment to happen — and hopefully be ready for it when it does. It’s by and large a spontaneous process. That being said, I have started work on two new series. For these, I am shifting towards creating more of a planned approach and have begun by writing a story with the same themes I want the photo series to have. I believe strongly in stories, so I think one of the best ways to tell a visual story is to begin with a written one. I approach my design work in very much the same way.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

Photography is most definitely not my profession, nor do I think I ever want it to be. I am currently a masters student, and a freelance writer and designer (film doesn’t pay for itself).

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

I shoot on a Konica Koniflex TLR, a Rolleiflex TLR (as backup for when the Koni is feeling temperamental) and a Polaroid SX-70. Film stock-wise it’s primarily Kodak Tri-X 400 or Ilford HP5 these days. For colour it’s Kodak Portra 400, but as soon as Cinestill deliver on their Kickstarter and bring their films to 120, I will be shooting a lot of Cinestill 800T and 50D as I love the way they render colour.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

Because photography is largely a therapeutic process for me, it is usually the madness of stress that motivates me to go out and shoot. Once I am out there it is the serenity of the process that reminds me why I take photos.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

In terms of photographers, I think my biggest influence and inspiration has to be Billy Monk. I think the level of intimacy he achieved with his subjects is something I can only dream of achieving. Another that I greatly admire is Roger Ballen. The way he is able to straddle a line between still life and portraiture in his work is awe inspiring. I also absolutely adore the macabre surreality of his images; you are never quite sure if what is depicted can or should actually exist. He is able to construct and portray these heterotopic spaces on the fringes of society in a way that few, if any, others can.

However, beyond those two and a few more, I actually try avoid other photographers as the line between inspiration and aspiration can very quickly blur into the realm of imitation. This is one of the reasons I avoid even dipping a toe into commercial photography as I feel it is fraught with photographic trends and your work quickly begins to become so much like everyone else out there. Instead I look to film, architecture and art for inspiration – Edward Hopper, Playtime by Jacques Tati, and Frank Gehry’s dancing house in Prague, spring immediately to mind. But, most importantly, the city of Johannesburg. I have lived in a few places throughout my life but Jo’burg will always be home and my main muse.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

I have an extremely restless mind and fidgety hands, so as a result I have a myriad of little projects in various stages of non-completion. Right now I am currently teaching myself to knit for a lighting project I have in mind. I am also teaching myself kintsugi which is a Japanese ceramics repair technique using gold infused lacquer to bind the pieces of broken pottery. Although cooking has to be my all time favourite hobby and creative outlet, alongside photography. There is little I enjoy more than feeding friends and family.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Don’t get caught up in the fact that you can’t delete botched shots, just be more considered and decisive. Go out there and enjoy yourself… and meter for the shadows.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)?
And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

Up until this point my photography has been an extremely personal thing, and something that has just been for myself and my immediate friend group (and whoever follows me on Instagram gets a taste too, I guess). But, I am slowly shifting towards putting my work out into the world in a more real, substantial way. I am in the conceptualisation stage of two zines that I want to do and, now that I am in the process of learning how to make darkroom prints, an eventual exhibition is the ultimate goal at this point.

Website: http://www.befok.space/
Instagram: @abernatzky

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All photos by Alex Bernatzky

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Lani Spice

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Lani Spice (b. 1989, Durban)
Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I would say landscapes at the moment. My interests definitely shift.

Describe your photographic style.

It differs, I think. Sometimes it’s kind of gentle, sometimes it’s more candid which could then vary in style. I guess it depends on the kinds of scenes or spaces that surround me, which shape the particular style I may have. I’m very much a hobbyist photographer.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life, and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

I guess it’s allowed a slightly different way of observing the world around me, especially through elements such as light, there’s a lot of feeling and life there. It has maybe influenced me emotionally too, in a positive way.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

As mentioned earlier, and where I am now, the images I take are much more informal and momentary as a moment is so fleeting and sometimes difficult to reproduce. I wouldn’t say I have a set approach, but maybe that I embrace any instincts I may get in that instant. When it comes to landscapes, however, it’s a bit different, especially when alone – there’s time and ease, and a kind of comfort I really enjoy. As far as a new body of work goes, I believe the research and creative processes side of a series are vital in the development and creation of one. I will get lost in that before producing any visuals.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

No it is not. I did study it, but never with the intention or feeling that it would be a professional practice. I think I just wanted to have a better understanding of it, which opened up a lot interests for me such as visual literacy – and with that curation and print. Work wise, however, I assist in managing a photographic studio and am in-house contributor for The Lake Magazine.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

Working a lot with gear has never been my strong point (probably wouldn’t hurt if it was, haha). If I’m not using my iPhone, I shoot with film cameras such as an Olympus AF-1 Twin Lens (point and shoot) and a Canon EOS QD, with 35mm mostly.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and enthusiastic about your work?

Considering it’s not my day job, I hardly run out of motivation. It’s more about making time for it.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or things that generally inspire your image-making process.

This question is always the hardest to answer because there is so much, and many photographers to be a fan of. To be ruthless and current, I would say photographers Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin are probably my biggest influence at the moment. Their experimental processes have inspired me a great deal. They also keep a relevant and strong voice within their work and manage to pull off pretty incredible productions.

Cape Town artist and lecturer – Dominique Edwards – she’s brilliant.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Zines and photo books mostly. Print is a beautiful thing.

I also really enjoy the theoretical side to photography. This has a lot to do with a short course I’m currently busy with, from MOMA, called Seeing Through Photographs where you to delve into it’s history and start to train yourself to have a more critical understanding and eye.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Just keep shooting and experimenting with different film types and cameras. Learn more about your craft and see where it takes you.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)? And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I’m in the early stages of two photography zines. I’ll also be in London in May, where I’m super honoured to be participating in the Independent Photography Festival (IPF).

Website: http://www.lanispice.com/
Instagram: @lanispice
Tumblr: http://www.lanispice.tumblr.com/

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All photos by Illana Welman

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Montage | 001

Instagram fragments.
(January, 2017)

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Adriaan Louw | @adriaanlouw1
Berlin, Germany

tumblr_ocd5f8uitf1tfx3h2o1_1280Daniel Futerman | @danfuterman
Accra, Ghana

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Zeno Petersen | @zenopetersen
Cape Town

tumblr_nsonj2bBxu1u800k9o1_1280.jpgYetunde Dada | @yetudada

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Duran Levinson | @duranite
Cape Town

tumblr_odroeamxQr1rp2n0ro1_1280.jpgKarabo Mooki | @mookimooks
Prague, Czech Republic

monique prinsloo.jpgMonique Prinsloo | @moniqueprinsloo
Heidelberg, Western Cape

IMG_6082.JPGMike Bell | @mikebellphoto
Lesotho

>> Follow our Instagram feed @dead.town

Individual photographs (C) to relevant owners/photographers.

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.