Eduan Groenewald

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 001.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 011.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 006.jpg

Eduan Groenewald (b. 1984, Oudtshoorn)
Grew up in Port Elizabeth, and currently living and working in Cape Town.

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

Anything interesting that catches my eye; may it be colour palettes, architecture, interesting people or situations. I’m always on the look-out for something or some place worth documenting. I celebrate the beauty in the ordinary and mundane.

Describe your photographic style.

This is a tricky one. I guess it depends on what I am shooting. I would say my style is honest.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

Life is an irreversible journey, and every moment that passes is history which cannot be recreated. Catching hold of time at a specific moment therefore is magical and a treasure. With this in mind, photography has made me focus more on my surroundings, and see things I wouldn’t normally take note of. The camera helps me meet new people as it forces me to dig deeper into the environments and situations I photograph.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

It depends on the purpose of the photograph. I first decide if the composition works for me – if it needs more, I will frame up and wait for something to happen in the frame. With regards to a new body of work, I’ll try and gain as much knowledge of the subject as possible, and from there it’s pretty organic and natural to the way I normally shoot. On the more spontaneous approach, it all depends to what I come across.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

Yes, I am a full-time commercial photographer. I professionally shoot studio work, with a 4×5 view camera with a digital back. I work in teams with stylists and set builders and buyers. The commercial photography is extremely well planned out, that’s why I enjoy film photography in my personal time – it’s more unpredictable and palpable.

With film, I’m all about the whole creative process. It’s more real for me. Digital photography is objectively easier, quicker and more flexible.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

My Olympus Stylus Epic (a.k.a. MJU ii) and Olympus OM2 SP, always loaded with colour film – mostly Fuji Proplus 200 or Fuji Superia400. I also carry a extra Olympus OM2 body with some b&w film loaded in it, preferably Kodak T Max 100.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and enthusiastic about your work?

I am very fortunate to have people around me who are also very passionate about photography. We are constantly talking ideas and photography and we keep each other motivated.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I’m inspired by my surroundings and the beautiful landscape I call home. I frequently visit Google Maps, looking for new and interesting places to visit and photograph.

Photographers who inspire me are; Martin Parr, William Eggleston, Philip-Lorca di Corcia, Alec Soth and the likes of Bruce Gilden, who is a very interesting character and inspiring to see his approach to the craft.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

I enjoy going on road trips, exploring new areas and places that are unknown to me. I DJ on the side, I enjoy cycling, gardening and having braais, spending time with the people close to me.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Get yourself a fully manual camera and experiment with different kinds of film. Keep on looking through that viewfinder. Take more risks and enjoy the beauty of everyday life. Buy a good scanner to digitise your files – you will save more money for film that way.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)? And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

This year I want to focus on more personal projects and collaborate with some of the photographers I’ve met through my journey with film. Next year, I want to travel to Europe again and go shoot there. Travelling abroad gives me better insight on what to shoot in South Africa.

Do you have a specific series or body of work that sums up your portfolio best?

I would say all my work together sums up my portfolio best. You can visit my website to see my film work. My film work and digital commercial work is worlds apart in style and aesthetics.

Website: http://www.eduangroenewald.com/
Instagram: @edgroenewald

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 010.jpg

R1-01021-0023.jpg       R1-06805-0002.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 029.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 022.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 014.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 003.jpg     superia_400_april_C200-170.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 025.jpg

Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 019.jpg       Dead Town - Eduan Groenewald 030.jpg

scans_website043.jpg

All photos by Eduan Groenewald

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Advertisements

Array | 001

tumblr_mxl8pvEz001r94jpko1_1280.jpg 0009_6.jpg Dead Town_0007.jpg IMG_0023-2.jpg

Jack Mason | Jen Jengo | Kleinjan Groenewald | Luke Maritz | Rowan Patrick



Jack Mason
(b. 1994)
Cape Town

I have an extrospective style of shooting. I try to capture the world around me as I see it through my mind’s eye, almost in an analytical sense. I consider myself to be quite a visual thinker and the act of taking photos is a sort of way of expressing the way I think.

I bring my camera to every festival I go to. I love capturing people in their element and just having a good time. I also like shooting landscapes.

R1-03302-0011.jpg

tumblr_nov02oytj71r94jpko1_1280.jpg    JACK_MASON06.jpg

tumblr_nd6xlf6jYN1r94jpko1_1280.jpg

Photography has become an integral part of my life and, in some ways, it is my life. It gives me much pleasure to be able to make images that people have an emotional reaction towards.

Shooting on film teaches you to slow down and be present in the moment. I try not to rush my shots and rather let the moment come to me. A bit of thought and pre-visualisation goes a long way, but I also try not to think about it too much. It needs to be something you feel in your gut. Part of the fun with shooting on film is learning to love the challenge and not to see it as a limitation. It will teach you to be more engaged with the art form, and ultimately, take better photos.

Instagram: @eyesofmason
Tumblr: http://www.eyesofmason.tumblr.com/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/eyesofmason/



Jen Jengo
(b. 1986, Durban)
Currently in Cape Town

There are a number of things I like to capture on film, so it’s hard to find a favourite. I very much enjoy photographing summer scenes and architecture. Oh, old and strange spaces too – I’m a very inquisitive person and I love to explore.

I much prefer the older analogue cameras – I love the grain and dreamy style I get from them. Photography is a practice, so keep exploring. Your photos are what you want them to be.

0020_17.jpg

0011_10.jpg   0007_4.jpg

0036_33A.jpg

Photography motivates me to connect with something new, quite often. It’s also my way of sharing what I love with those around me (or moments the way I see them), in the hope that it will evoke the same aesthetically pleasing feels in another.
 I usually trust my instinct in the moment and go for it. It’s all pretty spontaneous.

Instagram: @analog_diaries
Tumblr: http://www.jenjengo.tumblr.com/



Kleinjan Groenewald
(b. 1987, Pretoria)
Currently living in Cape Town.

I really enjoy shooting film; 35 mm, 120 and Polaroids, but shoot most of my work on digital format. I love shooting portraits, travel, lifestyle and food.

I like capturing real life around me more than something that is staged – I feel you get a better image and deeper connection with your subject. I also like a cleaner and more simple image.

Dead Town_0015.JPG

Dead Town_0001.JPG     Dead Town_0023.JPG

Dead Town_0011.JPG

Through my photography, I have been super fortunate to have travelled quite a bit (and that has made me realise what I really want for myself and what kind of work I want to do). We tend to only see the bad in the world, but there are so many beautiful places and amazing cultures out there, we just have to escape the comfort zone and explore a little.

I spend hours looking at other people shooting the stuff I want to shoot, to see what they do differently and how I can improve my work. I don’t see myself doing anything else.

Website: http://www.everfeltmedia.co.za/
Instagram: @k.groenewald



Luke Maritz
(b. 1990)
Cape Town

I really enjoy the process of creating. Photography allows me to do that in a few different ways. There is so much to explore and grow from.

I’m a visually aesthetic person. How something is seen and perceived is a constant conversation for me. Exploring style is incredibly important to me. My main focuses at the moment are fashion, street style and youth culture.

DEADTOWN SPREAD 1.jpg

DEADTOWN SPREAD 7.jpg

DEADTOWN SPREAD 2.jpg

I enjoy shooting portraiture, gritty industrial environments and documenting real life settings – noticing the finer details and pieces of the puzzle that are most often overlooked. Regardless of what I am capturing, I feel it is important to explore my approach and direction.

I think the journey of photography and documenting moments in time has influenced me way before I consciously thought about taking photographs. I relate the beauty of photography through real life situations and having an honest approach to documenting the things I choose to share. Looking through the lens of a camera is one form of capturing my visual journey through this world. Sometimes a daunting and harsh reality documented can send a strong positive message to others in the world – and that is fantastic.

Instagram: @lukeylifestyle



Rowan Patrick
(b. 1988)
Cape Town

I enjoy photographing people, places and the ocean. The feeling of summer weather influences the way I see photo opportunities – blue skies, warm skin tones and beaches.

I have learned to imagine the world around me through a viewfinder, and as cliché as this will sound, I have learned to see the beauty in things and places I would have never thought of. I always seem to be observing light in every space around me.

IMG_0001-2.jpg

IMG_0031-2.jpg   R1-07597-0007.jpg

IMG_0001-2-2.jpg

Following accounts of people who’s work you admire is very helpful to find motivation. I also collect a lot of fashion magazines from the 70s, 80s and 90s that have crazy good forms of inspirational work, all shot on film.

Keep working on your craft, experiment, take risks and always find time to shoot for yourself. Sometimes all it takes is one small item to get a whole body of work rolling in, like a hat or even a pair of cool sunglasses.

Website: http://www.rowanpatrick.com/
Instagram: @rowanpatrick_


>> Follow our Instagram feed @dead.town

Individual photographs (C) to relevant owners/photographers.

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Matt Kay

Welcome to Amazing ..-11.jpg

Welcome to Amazing ..-12.jpg

Welcome to Amazing ..-19.jpg

Matt Kay (b. 1985, raised in Nottingham Road, Natal Midlands)
Currently living in Durban

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I’m not sure I have a favourite subject, but I know what I’m looking for when I see it. It’s almost panic I feel when I see something to shoot – I’m scared I’m going to cock it up.

Describe your photographic style.

My style shifts depending on the project, I think that’s important. Photographers can be obsessed with creating their “own style” and I think often that comes across as forced. Also, the obsession with look or style can compromise the photograph. Everyone has a camera these days, but I think good photography comes with specific intentions not just a collection of cool pics. Photography is supposed to be difficult – it’s the easiest art form to get into, but the hardest to have a unique voice. Ironically, I think the secret to finding your own style is to stop trying to be different.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

I was obsessive once I started shooting, I read everything and photographed everything I could find. As I have progressed as a photographer, I’ve found that I’ve become less concerned with what people around me are photographing, and any approval in the photography circles. I’m more concerned with understanding what I’m doing with my photographs.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

I don’t really start with a specific idea for a body of work, its more a case of feeding off a previous image. If I take an image I’m happy with, then I start looking for images that can sit beside it – and in that way a body of work grows. It’s only really in the editing process that I start to understand what I was doing.

I have loads of work that I’ve done that I’m sitting on still trying to figure out what it is. I know I’ve done something but it can take years before I’m happy to say “yes, that’s finished, and I’m at peace with what it is”.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

Photography is pretty much what I do.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

35 mm: Rollei 35, Nikon F, Canon FTB (35 mm or 50mm lenses)

Medium format: Pentax 6×7, Hasselblad and a Mamiya twin reflex.

Film: Ilford HP5, black and white. Colour; mostly Portra (if I can get hold of it), but anything will do.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and enthusiastic about your work?

I definitely fall in and out of love with photography. I have periods of manic work and then sometimes months where I hate my camera and nothing seems worth photographing. What helps me is to take a break from shooting anything and do something else completely. I surf and study.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I have always had a soft spot for 1950s street photography, but I look at loads of photographers so these are really just a few off the top of my head –

Larry Clark ,David Goldblatt ,Thabiso Sekgala, Koudelka, Larry Fink, Chris Blue, Diane Arbus Araki, Garry Winogrand, Sabelo Mlangeni, Santu Mofokeng, Martin Parr, and my friend Michelle Loukidis who really taught me to love photography.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

I surf and I read the news obsessively.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Start on black and white, learn the sunny 16th rule, process film yourself and remember that a shit photograph is a shit photograph. Film doesn’t make it special.

…and read the writing next to pictures.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)? And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I’m hoping to start a new body of work in June, and I’m part of a group show in Tunisia with a few other African photographers which is pretty rad.

Website: http://www.mattkayphotography.com/
Instagram: @mattkayphotography

MK_TF_01.jpg

MK_MP_2.jpg

MK_TF_06.jpg

MK_S_18.jpg

MK_S_06.jpg

MK_S_03.jpg

MK_LG_06.jpg

MK_MP_4.jpg

MK_TF_05.jpg

MK_S_13.jpg

Welcome to Amazing ..-22.jpg

MK_S_05.jpg

All photos by Matt Kay.

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Katya Abedian

R1-02781-0021.jpg

09.jpg

08.jpg

Katya Abedian (b. 1998, Cape Town)
Currently in Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

People I love, people who tell me their stories without knowing it, the things that are usually looked over, discarded or misunderstood. I feel most “in flow” when photographing without thinking too much – to capture the way light is playing in a room or bringing life to a certain surface. It’s important for me to feel involved with what is in my frame, that is the only way I “give meaning” to the world.

Describe your photographic style.

Warm, sentimental, invoking, and a reflection of my inner world – how I feel in a moment towards my surroundings. I hope that my photographs are truthful and can stand alone to tell their story, a culmination of light that can speak for itself. That is the closest I can get to defining my style at this point. I am definitely not intentional about my photographic style, it is more about the forms of light or moments that draw my eye and heart in to capture them. Photographic style, in my mind, is synonymous with intention. I would say my intention is to photograph raw, vulnerable moments that do not ask to be called beautiful, but rather embody the essence of the word. Some of my photographs are subtle reflections of social issues that I hope to shed light on.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

When I first peered through the viewfinder of my first film camera, it was as if a portal to a new way of seeing had opened. Photography means a lot of things to a lot of different people. For me, it has and always will be a way to consolidate my sensitivity and sentimentality for the world and the fleeting feelings of myself and others. It has definitely made me a more in-touch human being, helping me to really differentiate between looking and seeing.

The photographic journey is a great teacher of how the most beautiful and irreplaceable moments lie in-between what we focus on ordinarily. My film camera is like a transportable teleportation device, taking me to new parts of myself every time I hold down the button, stepping back to reflect on how I saw something in that moment. It is an extremely personal and reflective process and almost every sincere photographer, I’m sure, will agree that taking photographs is like getting to know yourself in another way.

At the same time, taking someone’s photograph is an intimate space to be allowed into. Photography has connected me to others in a way that words or a conversation may not have. It has also made me aware of how vital it is to have respect for your subject matter, whether your subject is a human being or a body of water. Capture it for the sake of immortalising that moment and honouring the subject rather than capitalising off its beauty or wonder.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

My approach is always different. The one common thread is that I try to focus on how the shot feels rather than solely what is in the frame. I try to focus my eye on what is unfolding before me and then my job is simply to capture it in the most authentic way possible. I try to pay attention to light, movement, expression, the way things are coming together or falling apart, but not in a way that could lead to over-thinking. It’s a fairly rapid culmination of processes that go into one shot. Some shots can leave me hanging on for a few minutes.

Henri Cartier-Bresson once said that, “There are those who take photographs arranged beforehand and those who go out and discover the image and seize it.” The concept of seizing an image strongly resonates with me. Before taking a photograph, I consciously shift myself into a place of unconstraint seizing instead of trying to arrange things to look a certain way. I believe it is from this place where the most truthful and moving photographs are brought to life. Cartier-Bresson also mentions that, “To take photographs means to recognise — simultaneously and within a fraction of a second — both the fact itself and the rigorous organisation of visually perceived forms that give it meaning. It’s putting one’s head, one’s eye and one’s heart on the same axis.” It is safe to say that he sums up my approach to taking a photograph pretty eloquently.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

With regard to photography, yes and no… I would like to organically move towards channelling my passion for photography into a professional environment, but I feel I have a lot of figuring out to do before I go knocking on those doors.

In terms of a career, directing films is my aspiration. The love I have for cinema springs from a truly authentic part of myself. The worlds of film and story-telling have always been the realm that I find myself lost in. I hope to attempt to change the male-dominating field of film directors, even if I am just a drop in that movement. It’s about time that we start evening out the playing field. This only really surfaced when I stood back to reflect on the fact that, besides Sofia Coppola, all the directors I look up to are males. There is nothing changing the fact that they are geniuses in their own right; but it would be great for future female, aspiring directors to have a more equal pool of inspiration to draw from, so that they don’t start believing directing is a field that only males excel in.

Talking about other fields, I have made the decision to study medicine instead of film. Directing and film-making for me is a profession that I am thrilled to learn by doing. I think I have learned more from jumping into unknown territories and then trusting my artistic instincts than I would have learned in four years of film school, in my humble opinion. Surrounding yourself with the right people is also key to getting anywhere as a director. The collective effort that goes into making a film – the concept of having a family of diverse individuals with a range of specific talents and capabilities – is another element of film-making that brings me a lot of excitement. I thrive in environments where collaboration and collective creativity come before personal gain or competition. The feeling of having this family of people from all over the place, where age or position in life is irrelevant, all working towards bringing this vision and story to life, that for me is what you could call “career goals”. It is pretty much the same concept with something like performing a surgery.

Most people are often confused or amused when I mention that being a doctor and a film director are life goals of mine; but I see this life as a process of cultivating all your God-given capabilities and talents to serve humanity. So I have chosen not to fall into the trap of thinking I have to choose one over the other when I could very well pursue both (or at least try to with the best of my ability). Why would I not choose to potentially be twice as useful to others as a human being professionally? Plus, I think it is small-minded to think that the two fields are worlds apart when both have foundations in meticulousness, passion, work ethic, empathy and a love for the human condition.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

I shoot with a Pentax and standard 35mm Fujifilm. I’m starting to use Kodak Portra 400 film, but it feels like I am shooting with gold.

As cliché as it may sound, I’m starting to realise that a great photographer only needs her/his eye and her/his heart to take a beautiful photograph, rather than a prestigious camera or the best film stock. No doubt that those could lift a photograph to new heights but some of my favourite images were shot on a film camera that was broken and not even supposed to work.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and enthusiastic about your work?

I think artistic growth is inevitable, it’s really just about the rate at which it takes place. I try to find the balance between being patient with and challenging my artistic growth. I push myself to photograph subjects or be in environments I am unfamiliar with. I try to not set my mind on the idea of only photographing certain things, as apposed to what I happen to be in the unique position to “seize”. Maintaining forward-movement is important. To just keep taking photographs and sensitising your eye to light and what photographic process feels most truthful.

I definitely feel most exhilarated when I am uncomfortable while shooting. I’ve taken some of my best photographs in surroundings that were either pouring with rain or so obscure that I had no idea where I was after I had taken the photograph and looked up. I hope that feeling will only ever grow the more I do it.

I always say that shooting on film is my healthy and sustainable “high”, especially working solely in the medium of film because it’s always the gamble of a photograph coming out of the darkroom and being one of three things; less vivid than the moment, exactly how the moment felt, or even more beautiful and visceral than the moment. The last are the photographs any photographer hopes for. I also plan to start processing my own photographs once I find a place to turn the bathroom into a dark room – which is motivating me to learn everything from the ground up about the entire photographic process, from seizing the photograph to seeing it re-appear in the darkroom.

Ultimately, I hope that as I grow as a conscious human being, the images I render will grow with me. I love to be pushed to the point where I feel each image has revealed a new way-of-seeing when compared to the last. Whether that push comes from inside, someone else or a place is less important.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or things that generally inspire your image-making process.

My inner world inspires my image-making process. Whatever I am feeling or going through naturally comes through in the photographs that I take. On the contrary, sometimes my photographs reflect what I am yearning for. A beautiful, naturally occurring landscape or an off-beat composition or emotion catches my eye and stirs inspiration, but ultimately inspiration itself is a two-fold concept. I capture what stirs something up inside of me. So I would say me, myself, the one that I am trying to know better everyday, is my fundamental inspiration.

Masters like Henri Cartier-Bresson, Sally Mann, Imogen Cunningham and Malick Sidibe have definitely served as catalysts to my image-making process. Cartier-Bresson is a photographic poet, Mann creates visual nostalgia with her images and both Cunningham and Sidibe’s portraits are endless sources of beauty and inspiration.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Besides film and cinema; writing, music and language are huge creative outlets . The piano has been my soul instrument from the age of six, and I am working on expanding both my musical and linguistic abilities. Writing, like photography, has become somewhat second-nature. An expression I am trying not to become too thoughtful of but rather let it flow when it needs to flow, and rest when it needs an incubation period.

Many of my interests are interlinked; poetry, art, writing, music, biology and sciences, human behaviour, cosmology, biomimicry… the list goes on. I like to spend my time attempting to be of service to others, speaking about things that are perceived to be too complicated to change (the equality of men and women for example) and taking care of as many plants and human beings as possible.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Don’t care about what anyone thinks of your photographs; take praise and rejection with the same lightness-of-heart. The only opinion that matters is your own. Keep taking photographs, don’t ever think you’re not capable of being a great photographer. If you feel it in your gut then you have what it takes. Also, a good photographer takes thirty-six shots but only keeps and shows one. Learn the art of refining your visions.

Follow your inner eye and do not for a moment focus on what “kind” of photography is popular, or think you should be doing it this or that way. Do you. Explore everything and stay open to divine inspiration. Most importantly, don’t overthink it or be too hard on yourself. Enjoy your journey at every stage because no one can walk the path that you are walking and not everyone has the perseverance to cultivate their art seriously.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)? And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

At the moment, I am working on my first short film that I wrote and am directing and producing. I have a few bodies of photographic work that I would love to exhibit if the time and place is right. I will be living and serving in India, at a Bahá’í-inspired school, for half of this year which I am really looking forward to.

I aspire to build more confidence in my abilities as a director and artist in an industry still dominated by males. I would like to create work that unites and awakens and does not feed into existing discriminatory and harmful cultures. To keep creating for the sake of materialising something beautiful that others can connect with and feel something from. To maintain an open, world-embracing vision that is not held back by borders or earthly constraints. And most importantly, I hope to constantly become more in-tune with the stories that potentially only I have the opportunity to make known to a wider audience – the artworks that are my responsibility to bring to life in order to bring more connectedness and love.

Instagram: @katyaabedian

01a.jpg

11.jpg

06.jpg

05a

F1040005 (1).jpg

03.jpg

14.jpg

02.jpg

R1-00650-0005.JPG

04.jpg

07.jpg

10.jpg

All photos by Katya Abedian

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

 

John-Alex Second

F1010019.jpg

F1170006.jpg

F1030009.jpg

John-Alex Second (b. 1988, Stutterheim)
Currently living in Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

Faces and spaces.

Describe your photographic style.

I like to think that it is subtle.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

Fundamentally it has driven my curiosity about people and space. Communication and dialogue skills are also continuously being tested and hopefully improved, which I believe is valuable.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

It varies; environment and subject largely dictate the above. Generally, shooting street is candid and fleeting. There are, however, times to construct and consider more, particularly in studio.

Regarding a new body of work there is definitely an amount of research. Once I have formulated an idea, it comes down to making some images. If it works, I explore. If not, I tailor and adjust.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

No, I don’t get paid to make photographs. I work as a photographic assistant.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

I have an everyday compact 35mm point and shoot, a sometime SLR and an often 6×7. Film stock varies between Portra, Ilford and ProPlus

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and enthusiastic about your work?

It’s important for me to remember that I am doing this for myself, it’s not something that I can force. If I’m not feeling it, then I let it go and see how the next outing or interaction treats me. Having said that, if people respond to it, be it positively or negatively, then great. Not being too concerned, or consumed with what other photographers might be doing also tends to help.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I’m not sure a list really means anything. I think everyday banality and excitement is pure and excellent.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Walking around and watching people – how they interact with each other and behave is incredibly entertaining. I skate as often as I can.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Shoot and figure out what you like. Get to know light.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)? And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

To be honest, I don’t really know. I do know that I don’t want to do anything else but make photographs. If anything allows me this luxury, I will do it.

Instagram: @johnalexsecond

F1020004.jpg

F1010031.jpg

F1080036.jpg

F1090029.jpg

F1100015.jpg

F1100017.jpg

img882.jpg

img677.jpg

R1-02812-0035.jpg

F1010035.jpg

R1-06107-0007.jpg

img465.jpg

All photos by John-Alex Second

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Monique Prinsloo

Iceland Double Exposure_2013_04.jpg

Iceland Double Exposure_2013_03

Iceland Double Exposure_2013_07

Monique Prinsloo (b. 1984, Johannesburg)
Currently living and working in Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

People. But I am not very good at it yet! My second favourite: Horizons.

Describe your photographic style.

My partner and I travel throughout our beautiful country & continent regularly, and I document what I see around me on film as best I can. So in a way my photographic style is more a visual essay so to speak, of our adventures together.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

I capture moments with a very bulky Zenza Bronica film camera. Not only is it heavy, but it has a noisy shutter too — so photographing people is rather tricky and I have very few portraits. The way in which film photography and specifically my camera of choice has influenced the way in which I perceive the world, is rather remarkable. I have become more respectful towards individuals I photograph, because I cannot “sneak a pic” if you will. My Bronica is too conspicuous for that!

Our culture loves instant gratification; “take a picture – get that moment!” — and in a heartbeat you’ve selected a filter and uploaded the image to your Instagram profile. Very few people take a moment to consider whether that person is okay with you taking a picture of them and making it available for anyone to see. I’ve made this error many times, and it can at times be difficult to approach individuals. But I try make an effort and first ask the person’s permission to take their photograph. Usually they respond in a very positive way.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot, and your approach to a new body of work?

Since so much of my work is collected on our travels, I don’t usually over think my approaches towards capturing my images. I let the moments come to me, and I photograph them when they do. I let a body of work present itself organically from this process.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

I do not label myself a photographer at all — there are so many incredibly talented photographers in the world who push their medium wholeheartedly. I prefer to see myself as a visual artist who seeks to explore the world by making use of the photographic medium. Only recently have I resumed my fine art practices, and it is a very slow process. But to pay the bills, I freelance as a Storyboard Artist and Creative Researcher.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock. Also tell me about your darkroom?

90% of the time I have my medium format Zenza Bronica on hand, but when I have space I also pack my 35mm Canon Elan film camera — with which I can shoot double exposures rather accurately. I used to predominantly shoot on black and white film in order to hand process the film stock. But due to limited space and time, and my interest in colour film, I’ve made a decision to pause hand processing black & white film.

I think the transition to colour film photography came after the residency I attended at NES (Skagaströnd, Iceland), when I thought it would be a great idea to build my own darkroom in the studio. The residency was very far removed from any processing labs (closest was 5 hours by bus), and so I shot predominantly on black & white film except for one medium format colour film — which was the most successful roll of the entire batch. I worked through about 12 black and white medium format films and 12 black and white 35mm films, and heaps of photographic paper. Needless to say, lesson learnt: In a country with golden hour for at least 5 hours of the day, shoot colour — not black and white. Besides, I am not a very pedantic person in the darkroom and I get dust and blemishes on my film all the time.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I truly admire Caroline Denervaud. She is an artist who creates dreamlike shapes through movement, on paper or in space. Haruki Murakami’s novels are definitely at the top of my list as well.

In a nutshell drawing, literature, and dreams deeply influence my artistic practice and I am working on an idea towards a body of work where I can incorporate drawing and photography in a fresh and inspiring way.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

When I feel pressured or frustrated, I sew. I was fortunate to be raised by a mother who made all my clothes since I was a little girl, and now I’ve become very selective of what I buy and whom I buy it from. But I attempt to make all my own garments by hand.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

My partner reminds me every day that not one person knows all there is to know about their field of practice, and we should never stop learning.

Research. Read a lot. Pay attention and make mistakes, this is how you learn and often it is the smallest detail that has the largest impact on your work and for which you pay the greatest price.

Don’t be afraid to ask for advice and never forget to play.

What lies on the horizon (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels etc)? And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I hope to attend a residency this coming August/September — with this comes a great deal of planning, and if all goes well I hope to exhibit my project upon my return!

Website: https://www.moniqueprinsloo.co.za/
Blog: https://www.monpetale.co.za/
Instagram: @moniqueprinsloo

Cederberg_2016_02.JPG     Cederberg_2016_01.JPG

tumblr_nrks92alDC1ru7le0o1_1280.jpg

Lesotho_2015_06.JPG    Lesotho_2015_05.JPG

Iceland_2013_03.JPG

Namibia_2015_04.JPG

Lesotho_2015_01.JPG    Lesotho_2015_02.JPG

Namibia_2015_07.JPG

tumblr_o42wyzRY5C1ru7le0o10_1280

Namibia_2016_03.JPG

All photos by Monique Prinsloo

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.

Montage | 003

Instagram fragments.

Portrait_1_1000.jpg
Kyle Weeks | @_kyleweeks_

2016-11-25-0060
Wilhelm Venter | @wilhelm_venter

0037_35
Sarah Hugo-Hamman | @sarah_hugo_hamman

arlington virginia 2012_1
Paul Shiakallis | @paulshiakallis

iris pilot.jpg
Christiaan Beyers | @iris_pilot

F1020015
John Alex Second | @johnalexsecond

IMG_8363
Kevin Murning |@kevin_murning

16123679_1147109875386801_8590680262747095040_n
Luke Daniel | @maddogdaniel

>> Follow our Instagram feed @dead.town

Individual photographs (C) to relevant owners/photographers.

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017.