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Instagram fragments

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Elie Benistant | @elie_benistant

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Jared Paisley | @jaredpaisley

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Alice Mann | @alicemannnn

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Danon Pina | @danon_pina

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Sivan Zeffertt | @sivanzeffertt

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Camilla van Zijl | @camilla_van_zijl

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Murray Williamson | @momentaryfindings

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Luca Vincenzo |@lucavincenzo_

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Pano Ladas | @panoroller

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Astle Seethal | @astle_hadacamera

We always welcome photography submissions, as long as it is analogue (35mm, 120, large format, etc.). Email us on: deadtownphotoclub@gmail.com

>> Follow our Instagram feed @dead.town

Individual photographs (C) to relevant owners/photographers.

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2018.

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Touch | 009

I’m Fine Today by Duran Levinson

Published by COY, I’m Fine Today is the debut solo print publication by Cape Town’s Duran Levinson, exclusively shot on 35mm film in various countries. The photo magazine is divided into chapters and has three different cover designs. It is also the first in COY Culture’s Anthology series.

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I’M FINE TODAY” by Duran Levinson is a travel documentary in book form. Spanning a global journey ranging from Rwanda to South Korea, Thailand to China, this book showcases the culture and humanity that exists in our world through the perspective of one of this generation’s most spectacular talents – Rhys Stocks, coyculture.com

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Specs:
– A4 matte magazine size (122 pages).
– 3 different covers are available (inside is identical)
– €30 / $35 per copy. Discounts for wholesale orders.
Print and digital version available HERE.

View our feature on him from last year:
https://www.deadtownzine.wordpress.com/duran-levinson/

 

Robin Bernstein

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Robin Bernstein (b. 1990)
Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I enjoy environmental portraiture, real life culture and documentary style. I’ve always been drawn to subjects and their relationship to the urban spatial environment.

Describe your photographic style.

Documentary rooted in contemporary culture, and its relationship to urban structures of the past. I find this (I like to think optimistic) way of looking at South Africa’s present state against the backdrop of its troubled past acts a fertile ground for the making of relevant and interesting pictures.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

Photography wholeheartedly grips and governs my life. From the age of 19 I’ve tailored all aspects of my life around photography, from business through to leisure.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot and your approach to a body of work?

For me, photography is also about capturing a moment in time that embodies or signifies a larger span of time. Regarding shots, I try to take the Eggleston approach; edit with the viewfinder, shoot only one frame (or less rather than more) of any particular subject. Bodies of work for me generally refer to long term well considered photographic investigations of a particular subject.

Personally I enjoy working on longer term bodies of work, that may morph and change in their vision slightly as a result of the time I spend on them. I find this brings a certain realness through timeous consideration to the work.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

Photography is my professional career. I take pictures, work as a lighting and as a digital assistant in the commercial industry, and I also co-own and act as crew manager at Cape Collective Assist, a stills crew agency/collective based in Cape Town.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

Currently, I bounce between a Fuji GW67ii rangefinder and a Mamiya RZ 67 Pro ii for most of my work. I love the rangefinder for its relative compactness and portability. I always carry an on-camera flash. I also occasionally shoot a Nikon L35ad point and shoot for my 35mm stuff. Film wise, I shoot mostly colour negative; Kodak Portra 160, 400 and 800, as well as Ektar 100.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and enthusiastic about your work?

You just gotta keep on shooting.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

Many reasons. First off I prefer the aesthetic quality that film gives when it comes to my personal work; softer grain versus the clinical perfection that digital cameras strive to reach. Colour negative has a particularly large dynamic range, which is great. I enjoy the way focus fall off reacts to your film plane on larger formats. From a work-flow point of view, I really enjoy the consideration one is forced to make when working with film — your mind has to be much more focused while shooting.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or things that generally inspire your image-making process.

Photographically I find myself always turning back to a pre-Instagram golden era of photographers such as Phillip Lorca Di-Corcia, Stephen Shore, Martin Parr, Garry Winogrand, Bruce Davidson, Susan Meiselas, Edward Burtynsky, Jeff Wall, Alec Soth, Rineke Dijkstra and Andreas Gurskey— masters all in their own right. I find myself appreciating and drawing on various aspects from each of their work, from composition, conceptual backing and direction of subject, to use of colour and use of light.

My current ‘day job’ is working as a digital operator and lighting assistant in the commercial photography industry, and as such I’m continually exposed to, and influenced by, the workflows of some prolific and highly skilled individuals on the international stage in that industry. Despite my inherent lack of interest in commercial work or fashion for fashion’s sake, through working in in this area of photography I have developed a great interest in fashion as a vehicle for modern culture, and I feel that this new found interest plays heavily into my more recent personal work.

Finally – and most importantly – I try to let the world around me shape my way of seeing and recording it. I try to allow happenings in my personal life; emotions, music, motion picture references, as well as those from art and literature sit on the peripheries of my mind while I photograph.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc. – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Surfing, being in nature, really long drives, music.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

As a photographer, whatever your medium of choice is just make sure you aim to master it, but never at the expense of missing the shot.

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

As I mentioned earlier, long term projects are my thing. I have a number of them in the pipeline, some of which I hope will come to fruition soon.

Website: http://www.robinbernsteinphoto.com/
Instagram: @robin.bernstein
Cape Collective Assist: http://www.capecollectiveassist.com/

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All photos by Robin Bernstein

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2018.

Touch | 008

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Some Near. Some Far by Gideon de Kock

The first solo photo book by the South African film photographer based in Hong Kong features images from 2014 to 2018.

Some Near. Some Far has been a labour of love, and not only a journey through Hong Kong, but a journey of self-reflection. Here is a collection of film photographs taken in Hong Kong between 2014 and 2018. It’s a story about contrasts, and a tribute to the underdog. It’s about forgotten things and forgotten people. It’s early mornings, late nights and everything in-between. It’s mostly colour and a bit of black and white. It’s pure and honest Hong Kong.”

Self-published and printed in Hong Kong – 160 full colour pages, 140g matte art paper, hardcover, cloth bound. Designed by Well. First Edition limited to 100 copies.

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The book was launched alongside an exhibition at Kubrick in Prince Edward (@hkkubrick2001) and will be available online HERE.

There will be a book talk at Kubrick on the 16th of August, from 19:30 – 21:00.

Sample spreads below:

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Gideon was also published in our print publication. Read our interview with him on the blog too, HERE.

 

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Instagram Fragments

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Lauren Brits | @laurenbrits

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Jonathan Wood | @jonowoodinjozi

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Rudi Geyser | @rudi.geyser

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Madeleine Bazil | @mads_baz

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Sean Sequeira | @seansequeira

MARC NEILSON - DEADTOWN

Marc Neilson | @marcneilson_

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William Sheepskin | @willysheepskin

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Elie Benistant | @elie_benistant

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Callan Bosch | @callanbosch

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Marnus Strydom | @marnusstrydom

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Camilla van Zijl | @camilla_van_zijl

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Kleinjan Groenewald | @k.groenewald

>> Follow our Instagram feed @dead.town

Individual photographs (C) to relevant owners/photographers.

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2018.

Touch | 007

Efflroescent Cherry Matt Slater-9

Efflorescent Cherry by Matt Slater

Published by Quiet Sun Books

96 pages
Handmade by artist
Printed on Advocate 220gsm paper stock
Edition of 50

Launch on 2 August at 31 Loop Street, Cape Town CBD

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More info about the series:

Efflorescent Cherry is an exploration of the beauty of imperfection and the traces of  human touch and its anomalies.

At the core of Efflorescent Cherry, there are strong accents of an ancient Japanese aesthetic and worldview known as Wabi-sabi.

Wabi-sabi aesthetics comprise of characteristics such as asymmetry, irregularity, roughness, minimalism, modesty, intimacy and to see value of the ingenuous integrity of natural entities and processes.

Impermanence, the acceptance of transience and the serenity that comes with the process of ageing also permeate throughout this ethereal body of work.

Throughout this work the intimate confrontation with the fleeting moment heightens the appreciation of the beauty within these transitory states.

My process of creating work involves engaging with more archaic photographic practices; working with analogue cameras and in the darkroom.

The workflow I use is very intuition based and experimental. The darkroom allows the work process to be meditative and by using alternative printing methods in my image making; the work opens itself up to ‘flaws’ and irregularities; creating an alluring quality through spontaneity.

> Read our Interview with Matt Slater

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Also check out his recent collaboration with Lani Spice, resulting in a zine released in 2017.

Shalom Mushwana

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Shalom Mushwana (b. 1994, Grahamstown, a small town in the Eastern Cape)
Currently based in Johannesburg

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I photograph a variety of subjects. I enjoy portraits, architecture and still life, like the random interesting setups you find out on the streets or within peoples homes/spaces.

Describe your photographic style.

I photograph pretty classically, I guess. I try to break away from that with the content I choose but generally pretty well composed. Think Alec Soth and Santu Mofokeng, something in between their styles. Very loose content, allowing free association between how one image may or may not relate to another. I’m trying to hone a sort of poetry through my photography.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

We’re always looking as photographers, so it’s pretty inevitable that you’re always looking through a lens even when you you don’t have a camera in front of your face. Personally, I’ve learnt a lot about not having a camera with me, recognising the beauty of experiencing life. When I have a camera with me consistently, the experiencial moments of life are often diluted by the fact that I’m trying to capture whatever moment may be flung in front of me. With this in mind I believe that much of my cues to photograph come from a good balance of being able to experience the moment; I’m either in my own head completely or simultaneously involved with and/or detached from the experience.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot and your approach to a body of work?

I can be a relatively withdrawn and anxious person so a lot of the time I don’t actively seek moments to photograph — I’m really patient so I play a pretty strong waiting game with the images I create. The politics of space, the relationship between myself and what I photograph, as well as the greater goal of the images I want to create are all things I consider before I capture an image (especially when working towards a greater body of work). That being said, sometimes I’m not thinking about any of the above things directly, so the indirect relationship between active and passive photography is another conversation on its own. In short, I believe that my approach is strongly informed by my intuition; I like getting a concept so deeply etched in my mind that the often “mindless” images I create come to life as a result of my meditation on a particular idea.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

I’m trying to freelance photographically, it’s an extremely saturated industry at the moment. I enjoy a variety of types of music so I spend a lot of time helping out friends with mix-downs, recordings, and sometimes arrangements. I’ve been working with video on and off but I’ve been trying to get into the habit of it this year. Otherwise, I’ve always had a passion for art; I love printmaking and drawing as well as animation. So I work in a variety of fields, honestly anything that’s going to pay the bills.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

I have an Olympus OM10 at the moment, but man I’ve photographed with so many camera’s in my career. Right now I’m pretty set on moving to large format (hopefully a Linhof Master Technika but will probably settle for a Graflex Speed graphic). I spent a few years photographing medium format but felt I needed to learn more, so learning to make do with 35mm and it’s gritty aesthetic has been important in changing my relationship to the aesthetisisation of an image. I hated 35mm, but I am sure that if the content of an image is good enough you overlook the grit. Film wise, I’ve been pretty set on Kodak’s Portra 400 and Illford HP5 plus. Flexibility is key to me, so having a roll loaded that I can shoot throughout the day and at night is fundamental.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

I don’t know honestly, I don’t feel like I can live without my artistic craft, I would be distraught. But reflection is probably my greatest motivation; looking back at what I’ve created, noting changes in approaches, seeing work I thought was amazing look terrible as well as seeing how some I’m currently making looks terrible. Watching your style grow, noticing the similarities in what you create. Knowing that my craft is growing is what keeps me growing.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

I have a story about this: During a festival in 2014 my first digital camera was stolen from me. I was studying Fine Art at the time and the photography lecturer I had was awesome, he let me use an old Nikon F90x I think, it had a terrible zoom lense that was filled with mould but it was all I had. This is about a year and a half after I started photographing. I learnt the whole monochrome analogue process, from negative processing to silver print processing. I was useless at the time but it was the only way I could photograph. So I photographed on film for a while out of necessity really, then it became a habit. Now, digital is a bit overwhelming, I find that my digital images turn out very sterile because of the ability to review and perfect an image. Digital photography is important though, especially in terms of accessibility to those that can’t afford the costly process of photographing on film (photographing consistently on film is a luxury I believe). The way it was brought into my life changed my philosophy of creating images, it made digital photography feel too rushed. Then again, photographing on film isn’t about superiority, digital will have better quality images no doubt, but it’s about the images you create, and using film shifts my approach, and that is the special thing to me.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I’ll always be inspired and thankful to the people who have interacted with me personally about the images I create and how to improve, so mentors of sort, who I will list below. I’m inspired by my circumstance in this world, by the difficulties and shortcomings of my life. I’m inspired by my parents and siblings. I’m inspired by South Africa and it’s gnarly history. I think understanding the place we live in and how the never-ending historical narrative can be a massive disappointment, but also huge source of inspiration to create work that is relevant to the contemporary — maybe it’s beautiful, maybe it’s ugly or even completely mundane. Also just the global society we have access to; it’s a bit overwhelming at times, but it’s influence on everything cannot be understated.

Brent Meistre, Monique Pelser, Buyahphi Mdlele, Michelle Loukidis, Zanele Muholi, Wolfgang Tillmans, Alec Soth, Carie Mae Weems, Cindy Sherman.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Playing guitar/keyboard, composing music, talking about life experiences with good friends and strangers, hikes and I’m tempted to get back into skateboarding, it’s been too long.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Don’t photograph for the hype, unless the hype is your intention. That shit is fleeting.

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I can only hope for the best. I’m always working on something, hopefully a group show or two is on the cards this year, nothing solid yet. I’m currently bound to Johannesburg, but travels to a variety of places are always on the horizon — I’m quite an impulse traveler.

In the future, I hope to be running a multimedia studio, allowing a variety of disciplines of art to be available all under one roof, hopefully connecting and creating news ways of manifesting visual ideas.

Instagram: @shalom_mushwana

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All photos by Shalom Mushwana

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2018.