David Copeland

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David Copeland (b. 1988, Johannesburg)
Johannesburg (still here and frothing at the bit)

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

Landscapes, nature.

Describe your photographic style.

Reverent witness; “an austere and blazing poetry of the real” (Ansel). I’m essentially seeking proof, in images, of a symbolic design, a formal perfection or spiritual presence, which in its epiphanic realness only the medium of photography can justly capture, and which, in a sense, justifies photography as a “creative” medium. For given that a photographer’s vision is more subordinate to empirical nature than, say, a painter’s, one’s expressive parameters are limited to relatively narrow, though by no means, simple choices. Thus a patient humility is enjoined, a poised receptiveness, whose task is more to reveal than to invent – a chemical midwifery to light’s apparitions over the face of the waters.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

It began as a means of arresting evanescence, evoking the ineffable, and I turned to it during the usual adolescent awakening to mortality, which for me was associated with the “holy moment” episode in Waking Life and an affinity with the Impressionists. Overcoming such sentimental attachments was the first step towards objectivity. I’m not sure that photography has had a pronounced influence on my personal life, as such; practically, it’s begun to affect choice of accommodation, which must now facilitate a darkroom. I think the more you practise the craft, the more attuned you become to visual patterns, forms, qualities of light, etc.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot and your approach to a body of work?

Landscapes are often a matter of luck – being in the right place at the right time – but I try to acquaint myself with a location and note the positions of sunrise, sunset, weather conditions (The Photographer’s Ephemeris is a useful tool). Then I’ll go back if need be, or if I can (mountainous locations are not always easy to reach), and hope for co-operation. I didn’t start this series of landscapes with a body of work in mind, but I became aware, as time went on, of patterns or themes that began to organize my vision. I’m adopting a more deliberate approach now that I’m starting on some more conceptual work. It’s less a waiting game, more active.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

I work in tertiary education.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

Pentax Spotmatic, Mamiya M645, Fujica G690, and a Linhof Technika III, loaded with Ilford traditionals or Deltas.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

My subject till now being landscapes, the anticipation of the next trip has always been a strong motive; and it’s not hard to feel inspired when nature’s swirling mist about some august peaks as God draws a slow bong. On the other hand, putting time and money into a trip and coming away with nothing can be discouraging. As long as I’m maintaining the illusion of making half-decent images, there occurs a very brief satisfaction, thirty seconds or so, when the print is finally toned and dried, after the hours on hours of testing, processing, assessing, adjusting, washing, self-mutilating, shouting, etc. That faint pleasure has apparently been enough to keep me going.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

It was the texture and tonal qualities and abstraction of black-and-white that drew me in. It’s a cliché, but it was also the process: the care and discipline required, the narrow margin for error, the satisfaction of working for the final image, which, as a print, has a material finality that a digital version never can. For me, the main justification for shooting film is the traditional wet print. It’s the lengthy way, but it forces you to focus on only those images that might have a chance of lasting. I find the keepers, in any case, are usually a fraction of one’s total shots.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

Darren Aronofsky had a strong influence on my general visual imagination and creative vision when I was younger. Ingmar Bergman was also potent (film-making was my initial ambition). My early photographic influences were my father’s old collections and annuals from the 70s. I didn’t treat it as a serious craft for a long time, but Michael Kenna was a lodestar when I started to. Since then I’ve admired Keith Carter, Fan Ho, Vivian Maier, Sally Mann, Edward Steichen, Edward Weston, and (locally) Nolan Lister. Eddie Ephraums’ Creative Elements has been a useful technical resource.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Poetry. There are a few pieces in Stanzas and New Contrast.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

On the technical side, learn on 35mm; move to medium format if you want resolution; abstain from GAS. Devving your own film is fundamental to tonal control. Assembling a darkroom is more of an undertaking, though I would also encourage beginners to print by hand – or at least to get a taste of it. Alternative Print Workshop’s dev and printing course is well worth it.

As for style or vision, film has a great look – no doubt – but it is the niche medium today and naturally so in many commercial fields: there’s all sorts work which it would now be laborious and even impossible to do on film. One can get into film for just the look, but as an aesthetic choice I think it’s worth having good reasons for doing so: Why film? What is it about film that complements, translates, expresses your way of seeing?

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

What lies on the horizon is hopefully more exhibitions, some new themes, a new body of work. It would be nice, at some point in the future, to be able to devote some of my working week to image-making.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/davidcopelandphoto/
Instagram: @davidcopelandphoto

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All photos by David Copeland

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2019.

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Luke Bell Doman

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Luke Bell Doman (b. 1991)
Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

People I guess, tshirts, cars, houses, dogs, anything that people associate with memories and happiness automatically. Obviously I’m referring to specific people with a specific experience. Na but forreal I come from a background in streetwear and I grew up in the suburbs so all these things come from a mixture of those things.

Describe your photographic style.

I like to think It’s kind of cute, kind of simple, a tiny bit cool. My composition and subject matter definitely speaks to the notion of street style photography although that is mostly out of necessity as those are the kinds of things people want from me. I’m really trying to inspire a moment of nostalgia for a simpler time when we liked things just because, not because of what they meant or why they are important. Just a moment though, nothing major. There’s really nothing loaded about my style, the word nice is seen as a lame way to describe things but I like it, it’s the first word that comes to mind really.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

Um…well first off it’s given me a craft to focus on so I burn energy that way which is important. It also gives me a realm in which to progress or regress. The burning of energy and the capacity to move I feel are important for mental health and such things. The idea of a culture, scene or industry is also important to me as it gives your existence a little context, although for the most part these things are pretty toxic. These things also give you the opportunity to engage with people who maybe think like you, which breaks you out of patterns of engaging only with people who look like you. Um….I guess my eye has changed. Before, I’d look at my surroundings as a series of things you could either skate or you couldn’t, now I look at the world as a series of potential backdrops or subjects. This has kind of changed the way I move, like now I find suburbs far more interesting than the city, where before I felt so drawn to the city. I also look at people differently, would you be interesting to photograph or no, what kind of shapes would you cut, do you have that thing in your face you can switch on. It’s very different from like, are you attractive or not. Some of these things kind of ruin life for me, like constantly seeing things through this lense affects the value systems through which you perceive, constantly judging people’s lives on like, would this make a good caption, would someone publish this blah blah blah so I try to stay out of that mode for the most part. I don’t ever have a camera on me nor do I take pictures in various circumstances like at parties or walking around, and I don’t take pictures on my phone really, I prefer to be there, present, a part of the world as opposed to a voyeur. When I do shoot it’s very deliberate, I’m going out with a specific goal, then I’m in the zone. When I’m not in that zone I try my best to perceive with a sense of naivety. More than anything, it has given me a vehicle through which to reflect the things I like, I like clothing so I can add to that conversation you know, as opposed to just being a consumer.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a shot and your approach to a body of work?

It’s always different really, depending on my mood and energy levels. Sometimes I obsess about an upcoming project for weeks, to the point that I hate taking photos and I wish I weren’t to do it. Sometimes I don’t think about it until Im literally standing there about to go. Certain things are always the same though, I always have a little character in mind, and a tiny narrative, it could be maybe three words, it could be an entire biography, there’s always a little world there that I don’t really ever share unless it helps subjects with direction. It’s funny for me choosing subjects is like casting characters in a role that they will never know and that probably won’t even really be reflected in the output, it’s just a fun game for me I guess. It helps me to maintain consistency when it comes down to details, like what would this person be doing here, does it make sense in a very loose way. I like to have someone with me, like a friend or assistant, just because I like the comfort it brings. When I’m actually in the moment of capturing a shot, what I really look for is magic, I frame loosely and then I make small movements and I try to be patient, waiting for the angles and ratios to find their power and show it to me. I rarely shoot people I don’t know personally, I’m terrified of people.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

I mean I guess at this point it’s what is making me money although when I think professional I think of an old white guy who pretends he knows things that others don’t so that he can take advantage of them. I do other stuff; logos, styling, creative direction, videos, writing, casting, I dno it’s been a weird year, I can barely remember. I’m not sure what I’m tryna do going forward, I’m not really inspired to make photos rn cuz what’s the point, publication? Money? Clout? Exhibition? All v boring. I also really haven’t seen anything that I really like recently its much of the same, specially down here in South Africa, and the people and things that get a lot of attention are pretty ordinary for the most part. Meh, I dno. Some of my homies like Kyle and Imraan and some of my young homies who are way better than me keep me interested cuz they are from here and are doing the things, other than that its very fake you know, it’s all nonsense like any other form of media. Might just go back to coaching at the UCT graduate school of business next year and just giving the whole thing up.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

Right now I’m focusing on shooting with my Bronica ETR si with a 50mm lens. It’s new for me cuz I only ever shoot portrait when I shoot 35mm, so now shooting only landscape is like a whole new thing, but I like the fact that I’m really now presenting a scene as opposed to a subject with a backdrop. I want to start making moving pictures so framing with the Bronica is helping me to understand how to create scenes or sets or whatever. For 35mm film I have a Pentax K1000 from my grandpa and I’m on my third or fourth Olympus Trip, which is where it really all began for me. With the Pentax my best is a 28mm lens, for me its best for capturing a full body look when doing the fashion or streetstyle type things. I’ve gone through millions of point and shoots but I actually don’t have one at the moment, my two go-to’s were destroyed by a wave that covered the whole fucking beach and went onto the path, guess the ocean spirits were mad that I was shooting at the beach even though I hadn’t been to talk to them in a while. So as far as gear goes I’m here tryna rebuild a collection tbh ‘cause I had to let go of some stuff to be able to afford the Bronica, so the images I’ve submitted weren’t shot on any of these cameras besides the trip. For 35mm film my ultimate best is Fuji 400 not that Pro XP trash, just the normal one, its kinda rare here though. For 120mm its Kodak Portra 400. I’m not really like a gear head (I had to google the name of my camera to see how to write it proper), nor do I understand what the cameras can actually do, i just try to figure it out as I go.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

Ugh I used to be very motivated because clothing and streetwear was my thing, and photography allowed me to really be a part of that conversation. Now that fashion is super dead I’m really not sure what compels me to keep going. Probably those rare occasions when you see your shit and you’re like ‘ok, I’m not terrible at this’. But na forreal it really does make me sad that fashion and streetwear have died such a nerdy white death, that shit was my shit and now its gone. I guess maybe the idea that if I keep practicing and trying new things I might be able to make a short film or something one day that really actually reflects the small world I have inside of me. Other than that I’m not sure tbh, i just kind of don’t know how to stop at this point.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

I guess the air of romance that comes with exploring a medium in the way it was initially conceived. I’m not sure, for me it was born out of the fact that I couldn’t afford gear and I was in no way interested in learning how to edit and shit like that, my attention span is minute so sitting in front of a computer doing something I didn’t know how to do seemed impossible. Also when I was small it was just a cool thing man, cruising around with a sexy little point and shoot, the anticipation when you’re waiting to see what actually comes of it, the excitement when your ratio of good to kak isn’t so bad. All these things give the whole thing life for me. Not that I’m opposed to digital, this is just what I like now. Each photo is special cuz each one literally costs money and time. All my homies shoot on film too so it’s something we share as friends which is nice.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I mean I try not to actively seek out inspiration or to look at other photography for inspiration because I feel that’s where things become derivative and that sort of process leads us to the homogenous mess we’re currently in. It’s more like I live my life like I always have, I consume stuff that I consume because I like it and then when I have to do something I guess a mish mash of everything I’ve consumed plays a role in whatever I come up with. Who knows. Memory plays a big role though. Like we see and hear things and those things become little stories in our heads. Over time those stories change shape, we lose pieces, add pieces, whatever, to form new shapes and ideas. It’s like a myth you know, or an epic poem from before writing was invented, every time the story was told, it was changed a tiny bit. This is how culture moved at a point, through myth and memory. I like that. So by the time I’m tryna make something, that little idea that inspired me is very different from the way it originally looked. I don’t go back to check the reference, I work from memory, making something that’s a little bit new, something with a little bit of my brain in the mix, but something you’d immediately associate with the same feelings or whatever. That’s not to say that I’m not inspired by things. If things inspire feelings of longing, nostalgia, melancholy, hope, despair, cuteness, power, anarchy in me, those things generally make me feel like doing or making stuff, cuz ultimately I’d like to inspire certain feelings in people. Also there’s a bunch of artists I love and respect; Kyle Weeks, Katya Abedian, Kristin Moolman, Ib Kamara, Robbie Augspurger, Lotta Volkova, Wanda Lephoto, Kabelo Kungwane, Anees Petersen, Petra Collins, Johnny Dufort, Misha Taylor, Imraan Christian, Jade Ayla, Harley Weir, William Stroebeck, Sep and Simon, Jabu Newman, brands like Sunnei, Richardson and Martine Rose, Jamie Hawksworth, Dapper Dan, characters like Princess Gollum and Ketu Malesa, Gondo, Samuel Ross, Manthe Ribane, Larry Clark, Fela and Desire, Stiff Pap, Nico Krijno, Kalo, Bradley Abrahams, Rei Kuwakubo, Alexander McQueen, all my young homies, um….fuck there’s way too many actually I can barely think.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

Skating but I’m fat and old now and I don’t find much time for it and also the culture here is pretty toxic its a bunch of old salty whites blocking bags and opportunities for young brown people who are far far better than them, fr it’s such a sif thing to see and be associated with. I must say though, the first things I probably ever made I was proud of were definitely little skate edits on my phone so it was super important for me in terms of building confidence and engaging on social media. Um, I like to hang and party and things like that too. Love watching stuff, series cartoons things like that. Love clothing although there really isn’t anywhere to wear nice things to here. Talking kak with certain people is my favourite thing to do in the world. I love driving and listening to music when I get to choose the music, its my favourite thing in the whole world so i guess talking kak is my second favourite thing. Um, lamming with my puppy is jas. As far as creative exploits go I mean I’ll do anything literally, product design is my ultimate fantasy but we live in a kak place for the kind of stuff I like, also I’m too impatient to fuck w the process. I like drawing and graphic design but I suck so bad.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

I’d say the most important thing is to focus on your shit, the shit you like, the shit that makes you unique, the shit that you like to consume not because you wanna make it but because it resonates with you for reasons you don’t yet know. Don’t focus on photography, photography is a tool, it’s a vehicle for you to enter the conversations surrounding the things you like, instead of being consumers. Don’t let photography itself become the object of your obsession, you’ll run out of subject matter real quick and you’ll fall into the trap of making derivative shit you think others might enjoy. People can smell that shit from a mile away fr. I can’t reiterate this shit enough, be obsessed with the things you’re naturally drawn to and use photography to engage with them. Be a person, be a child before you are a photographer. Make sure you get the chance to play every role you might encounter on set, style something, model something produce something so you understand the experience from these perspectives. Be gentle, be willing to adapt, relax, let go, be willing to fail all the time. Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. Try something new every time you get the opportunity. Don’t listen to anyone, don’t listen to me either I don’t know fokol I swear. Don’t get caught up in our society’s current obsession with ‘creativity’ and ‘talent’, that shits not real, this shit isn’t special, it just so happens to be what certain people are compelled to do, and it just to happens to be marketable at the minute. Breathe in, breathe out. Do things with friends. Leave your camera at home. Check your intentions. Stop shooting from references. Most importantly, network horizontally, stop sucking dick of people you think have something to offer you, suck your damn friends dick, that homie beeeeen there, since before your ass knew what a photoshop was.

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

Ugh had some things planned, some stuff fell through, some stuff fucked out so rn I’m not really sure. Gonna do young exhibition type thing December (2018). Mostly i’m tryna have fun and figure it out, this thing was never sposed to pain me as much as it has been lately so I’m really tryna reflect on what I’m actually doing here. But awe, I mean like I’m making work and practicing all the time even when I’m not putting stuff out there. Will do the big boy thing and approach agencies and stuff at some point so that’s like a vague goal. Videos and things too, like fictional shit, funny stuff, make people laugh, that kind of thing. When I’m ready, go back to focusing something that will help and inspire my young homies. It’s just like, this fake world is lame so really mostly focusing on where I’m even tryna be if that makes sense.

Instagram: @lukebelldoman

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All photos by Luke Bell Doman

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2019.

Ilan Godfrey

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Living With Crimefrom the series ‘Living with Crime

Ilan Godfrey (b. 1980, Johannesburg)
Johannesburg.

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

On a personal level, I am open to exploring various avenues that interest me and drive me to investigate and research further. These subjects are generally socio-political, environmental and resonate within the South African diaspora.

Describe your photographic style.

Documentary in approach, straddling the line between fine art and humanistic values.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

At 19 I boarded a plane to London, England where I studied two degrees in the medium; a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) degree in Photography and a Master of Arts in Photojournalism. It became my priority to document daily life, my travels across the world and ultimately find direction in my personal work, which resulted in me spending 11 years working on various projects related to socio-political issues within South Africa. Traveling between my hometown of Johannesburg and London (where I was based) allowed me to continue learning about my home country and the ongoing changes that were taking place.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot and your approach to a body of work?

I always have a camera close by and like to have one with me most days when I am heading out. Although, when I make pictures, it is generally with a body of work in mind; a narrative, a collection of images that make up a larger project. It is also the context in which you are working and what you are trying to say: the single frame could support a larger project later down the line. It is subjective. There are no set rules it depends on what you do with those images and how you show them – what’s your message, your visual language?

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

Photography is my professional career.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

I learnt photography shooting film as a child and shot on various 35mm cameras before moving over to medium format. When working with film, most of my personal projects are shot on a Mamiya 7II with a fixed 65mm f4 lens. Film stock varies although I do enjoy Kodak Portra 400 and 160.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

For me it is always about the story — a project that allows me to delve into a topic that may not usually get much public attention. I enjoy the challenge of scratching the surface, building narratives that are not obvious and essentially challenging on many levels. The process shifts from the craft to the issue at hand — I take on the role of an investigative journalist to a degree, using the photographic medium, sound, text and moving imagery as tools to bring the story to a wider audience.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

Whether working on film or digital it really comes down to what fits best for the situation or subject at hand. Understandably film is a slower process and it allows one to be more contemplative when framing up a composition. Personally, it gives me the time to think about what I want to say and why. Aesthetically it’s colour rendition, grain and the way it handles light is very special.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

I would have to say that in the early stages of my career, fellow image makers specifically of South African decent and the likes of Magnum photographers had a major influence on my style and approach. ‘In Our Time’ , a book which my father had on his bookshelf when I was a youngster was an influential reference before the internet age.

Today, I generally focus more on the environment in which I live, the people I meet, the places I visit and the books and news articles I read. I am constantly questioning my work in its progress and development: what it is trying to say and how to move forward in creating new work.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

I have become a tad obsessed with growing succulents and enjoy being in the garden. Generally I enjoy the outdoors, being in open spaces, fishing, walking and riding in nature. I am a father to a three year old boy, so I like to spend time with my family when I am not on the road. I also have a soft spot for the bush and head up north to take in the best South Africa has to offer when it comes to wildlife. I often think that I probably would have explored wildlife conservation as a career path if I hadn’t chosen to become a photographer… who knows, maybe I will combine the two in the future.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Keep shooting beyond the singular, beyond the pretty picture. Make work that speaks to a wider audience that engages people on many levels. Give your work purpose and meaning.

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I am currently working on several new series and collaborating on a project that I hope will come to fruition with our first trip to Ethiopia. It is a global endeavor, challenging and understanding ‘leadership’ in all its forms. I will keep you posted with more details as it evolves.

Website: https://www.ilangodfrey.com/
Instagram: @ilangodfrey

Selects from the series ‘Panarama Place’:

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All photos by Ilan Godfrey

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2019.

Legend | Dale Yudelman

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Cape Town based photographer, Dale Yudelman, has been capturing images for over 40 years. Born and raised in Johannesburg, he began working as a press photographer in 1979, later living in London and Los Angeles and then returning to a new democratic South Africa. While working as a photojournalist, Yudelman shot his own projects, including his 1980s series Suburbs in Paradise, where he navigated the turbulent state of the nation through striking black and white film photographs.

The series was first exhibited in 1988 and since then he has continued his passion by releasing other bodies of work, as well as producing various book publications. Yudelman has been acknowledged and awarded internationally and he continues to enrich the local photographic landscape.

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Website: http://www.daleyudelman.com
Instagram: @daleyudelman

All photos by Dale Yudelman

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2019.

Vincent Bezuidenhout

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Vincent Bezuidenhout (b. 1978, Bloemfontein)
Currently living between Cape Town and New York City

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I enjoy exploring new places and finding a new image I have never taken before.

Describe your photographic style.

I am interested in the strengths of the medium, like its ability to record information for example, but equally I want to explore the many limitations inherent in making photographs.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

Not being confined to a studio practice allows me to interact with the world directly in a meaningful way. These interactions help me to make sense of my environment, often in the shape of people I meet, or experiences I will have, but which are not necessarily photographed. The making of a photograph is in turn imbued with the richness of this journey which increases my understanding of the subject matter.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot and your approach to a body of work?

I rarely photograph something the first time, unless I have to, as my interest within the medium does not lie in one moment, but instead in images which exist within a much larger time frame. If I see something of interest and keep thinking about it I know there is something worth exploring and I will think how I can execute the image in a way that will suit a project. I sometimes take years before I make an image with the result that most of my bodies of work are simultaneously part of a larger whole.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

I have worked in photography and photography related industries my entire career.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

I use whatever camera is best suited for what I want to photograph. When I work with a large format camera I use a Sinar 8×10 camera with Kodak Ektar film.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

I work in a cyclical manner, and often after spending a few years on one project I will work on something different for a while. This allows me to reflect on past projects and subsequently to return to a previous way of working with a fresh perspective.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

I use film for its aesthetic qualities, obtained through both using a large format camera and from making large-scale prints. For these bodies of work, I prefer the subtle tonal values, gradation and image rendering of film as opposed to a digital camera.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

As a Tierney fellow I had the privilege of working with many great photographers and my early influences include The New Topographics and the Düsseldorf School. I continue to be inspire by both the old and the new, independent of medium specificity.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

I have a research-intensive practice and with the research actually taking up most of my time I send on a project, which, luckily, I enjoy immensely. As an artist I also work in video and installation and enjoy finding ways of combing these elements with my photographic practice.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Don’t listen to people who give you tips on how to photograph.

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I am currently working on a new body of photographs, combing various strategies I have used in previous projects about which I am very excited. In the future I want to continue to engage with the medium of photography as directly as I can, as it continues to shift and change.

Website: https://www.vincentbezuidenhout.com/
Instagram: @vincent_bezuidenhout

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Canal Walk Food Court

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Birds of Eden

The Margaret

Mile End

The Biggest Pineapple in the World

5_Oudekraal

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7_Strandfontein_Pavillion

All photos by Vincent Bezuidenhout

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2019.

Luc Lenferna de la Motte

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Luc Lenferna de la Motte (b. 1989)
Cape Town

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I’m a sucker for light and shadow interplay, particularly in nature. I’m also fascinated by nature’s role in urban landscapes and, lately, the human form in all its imperfections.

Describe your photographic style.

I would describe my style as most certainly on the minimal side. I like experimenting with the idea of ‘space’ within a frame and the simple beauty that it brings.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

Apart from it being my creative release, I find myself seeing the world through a camera lens wherever I go. When the light is just perfect, all I think about is burning that moment onto some film for prosperity.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot and your approach to a body of work?

I’m all about what catches my eye. I try not change a scene too much and let the natural elements do the work for me. I play the part of observer in a way, recording the aesthetic through my camera. In saying that, I’m also hardly ever without my camera.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

Photography is a career I’m currently pursuing. I juggle this with my current 9-5 at a tech start up, of which I am a founder. Photography keeps me sane in a way.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

My weapon of choice is a Canon AV-1, but I also dabble with my Olympus Trip 35 point-and-shoot and Minolta SRT-101. With film I usually hop between Kodak Gold 200 and Portra 400.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

I’ve never actually felt any type of slowdown or boredom from shooting film. Maybe I’m lucky… But really I think it’s understanding how every shot you take will differ depending on the scenario.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

To me it’s all about the process. Shooting film slows everything down, it makes you think of every single frame. Also, the fact that it’s a tangible burn of light is highly appealing to me.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

Wow, this could be a long list, but to name just a few; Lukasz Wierzbowski, Larry Hoffman, Gabriella Achadinha, Maya Beano, Michael McCluskey and Alexander Petsavas – all contemporary photographers).

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

I’m a huge outdoors person, so hiking and any adventurous getaway just gets me going. Goes hand in hand with my photography too.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

Find out what you really enjoy taking photos of. Trial and error is your friend. Trust the process.

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I’m hoping to host my own exhibition within the next year. Watch this space.

Instagram: @lucdelamotte

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All photos by Luc Lenferna de la Motte

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2018.

James Blyth

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James Blyth (b. 1996, Cape Town)
Currently living in Berlin, Germany

What kinds of things do you most enjoy photographing?

I started off by experimenting with one of my aunts old cameras that she left behind. I was teaching myself though documenting what was around me in my life, and then it grew further and extended into some of my work as a club photographer — one photo of which had a huge trend in North America. Now I’ve gone back to my roots of documenting moments that are special to me.

Describe your photographic style.

Minimal lifestyle documentation. I really try to put a lot more focus on the subject itself than the whole scene, because it brings the viewer closer into the photo.

Photography is a lot about the journey. How has it influenced your personal life
and the way in which you view the world (around you)?

My personal life changed a lot since I became a photographer, the places it has taken me and the things I’ve seen in Cape Town were unreal. It has opened my eyes a lot more to life. I am more aware of what is happening around me.

Photography is also about capturing a moment in time. What is your approach to a
shot and your approach to a body of work?

For my work, I mainly focus on documenting the present and capturing things that most people won’t see normally. Something in a special moment, that may be significant in the future.

Is photography your professional career? Or do you work in another field?

While I was studying in college I was working full time for both, but now that I’m finished I still find it hard to be able to support yourself in the industry. I have other jobs while working to get by.

What gear do you shoot with? Specifically camera arsenal and film stock.

Canon Eos 1V HS. Pentax K1000. Canon AF35mm. Fuji HD-M.

Growth is important for any artistic craft. How do you stay motivated and
enthusiastic about your work?

I have been finding this difficult since moving to Berlin because there is so much to take in. But I’ve been slowly working at it. The only way to stay enthusiastic about your work is to actually participate in the craft and your will learn and grow as you do it. You can’t just read about it or look it up on google — it takes practice to grow.

In the age where digital photography is prevalent, what draws you to film and what makes it special to you?

The physical element of it, as much fun of finding out what you’ve shot only after it has been developed. I like to have the physical copy of the photographs themselves. The physical copy of the film seems more special to me than just having a digital photograph. The film also has this element to it, like it is alive rather than where a digital photograph has a “more detailed” look but doesn’t feel alive, rather scientific.

What are your influences? Please list other photographers you look up to or
things that generally inspire your image-making process.

Kent Andreasen. Kyle Weeks. Tomas Wells.

What else do you enjoy? (Hobbies, etc – Any other creative exploits or interests?)

I produce and play music, as well as organising and managing music events. I used to play a lot more, but now that I’ve moved country I’m having to break into a different scene which has turned out more difficult than I thought, but I’m not giving up.

Any tips for aspiring film photographers?

The price of the camera doesn’t matter, it’s the purpose, skill and timing you need. Not a new or fancy camera, but whichever one you have with you.

What lies on the horizon? (any plans for series, exhibitions, travels, etc.) And what do you hope to achieve in the future?

I’ve just recently done a photo shoot with a Hungarian DJ for a fashion studio here in Berlin. I will also be doing a editorial shoot with the studio where we will do an exhibition of the photos in their space with guests and music.

Website: http://www.jamesblyth.ml/
Instagram: @jaaamesblyth

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All photos by James Blyth

DEAD TOWN™ | Film-only Photographic Showcase ©2017-2018.